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Research Guide: Aztec, Inca, and Maya: Overview

Background Topic Pages are an all-in-one starting point to begin your research process. The only thing you cannot access is the "Related Credo Articles."

Online Bibliographies

Oxford Bibliographies

This website gives a great overview of well known authors who have worked with this topic in the past and are well known scholars in their field, so I highly recommend this site because along with the mentioning of the well known authors it contains a bibliography, although short it consists of a great starting point for users to use for finding more books or articles about the conquest of Mexico.

Annotated Bibliography

This site was created by a history professor at California State University and she gives a great overview of the causes of the downfall of the Aztecs. What is even better is that she provides a great bibliography, the bibliography has both primary and secondary sources, the secondary sources will have more sources in their bibliographies that can be used for further research by the users to find more information about the subject.

 

 

Extended Essay Home Page

Suggested Websites

Exploring the Early Americas features selections from the more than 3,000 rare maps, documents, paintings, prints, and artifacts that make up the Jay I. Kislak Collection at the Library of Congress. The "Online Exhibition" portion contains many works with images of the conquest.

Hundreds of photographs and prints, reproduced from albums and published volumes, representing territories and countries associated with Portugal and Spain in the New World, including Mexico.

Images from the John Carter Brown Library collection at Brown University.

A database of images related to Mesoamerica. Part of the Wired Humanities project at the University of Oregon.

A project of Smith College, this collection contains not only images, but also references for further reading and essays on visual culture broadly.

Based on a physical exhibit at the Newberry Library, this digital collection focuses on colonial Mexico.

Professor Bakewell (Southern Methodist University) brings together images, texts, and objects relevant to the study of colonial Latin America.

City Library Books

Free Book Online

JSTOR

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JSTOR is an online archive of academic journals and primary sources. The JSTOR archive includes content in History, Language & Literature, Religion, Art & Art History, Education, Law, Science and Political Science. Most journals in the archive are added 3-5 years after the publication date.

  • All results contain the images and context of the original publication.
  • All results are full-text .pdf files.
  • Content continually updated.